Science, not silence

The March for Science is a celebration of our passion for science and a call to support and safeguard the scientific community. Recent policy changes have caused heightened worry among scientists, and the incredible and immediate outpouring of support has made clear that these concerns are also shared by hundreds of thousands of people around the world. Mischaracterization of science as a partisan issue, which has given policymakers permission to reject overwhelming evidence, is a critical and urgent matter. It is time for people who support scientific research and evidence-based policies to take a public stand and be counted.

On April 22, 2017, we walk out of the lab and into the streets.

We are scientists and science enthusiasts. We come from all races, all religions, all gender identities, all sexual orientations, all socioeconomic backgrounds, all political perspectives, and all nationalities. Our diversity is our greatest strength: a wealth of opinions, perspectives, and ideas is critical for the scientific process. What unites us is a love of science, and an insatiable curiosity. We all recognize that science is everywhere and affects everyone.

Science is often an arduous process, but it is also thrilling. A universal human curiosity and dogged persistence is the greatest hope for the future. This movement cannot and will not end with a march. Our plans for policy change and community outreach will start with marches worldwide and a teach-in at the National Mall, but it is imperative that we continue to celebrate and defend science at all levels - from local schools to federal agencies - throughout the world.

The March for Science - Phoenix and Fair will begin at Cesar Chavez Memorial Plaza (Historic City Hall), 125 W. Washington St., in downtown Phoenix on April 22, 2017 starting with a rally at 10:00. The March proper will start at 11:00 and proceed down Jefferson Street to 5th Street, up to Washington Street and back to 1st Ave, where the Science Fair and speakers will continue until 4:00 PM. Food trucks, water, toilet facilities and FUN will be provided!

The Phoenix March for Science is NOT JUST FOR SCIENTISTS - it is critical for anyone who supports science, science education, and science policy to join in this effort and stand with us as we advocate for our future.



The Team

Meet the organizers and committed members of the Phoenix March for Science:

Sedona Maniak is a wildlife biologist specializing in herpetology and environmental compliance. Most recently, her work and volunteer lives have centered on surveying for and conserving venomous reptiles, desert tortoise, and various other desert-endemic species such as kit fox and burrowing owl. In her spare time, she enjoys backpacking long trails (such as the Pacific Crest and Arizona Trails), woodcarving, target shooting, cooking and gardening. She has also applied science to brew a pretty mean India Pale Ale! Sedona currently lives in Chandler, AZ with her wife, family, an alligator lizard, a Sonoran desert tortoise and a very gregarious pit bull.

Don Balanzat is a Physics Educator at ASU who designs, maintains, and performs physics demonstrations and experiments for undergraduate lectures and outreach events. He graduated from Rutgers University in his home state of New Jersey, where he worked in the Physics Demonstration Lab for four years while obtaining a B.S. in Physics. He seeks to understand and teach others about the various sciences which permeate modern life and currently lives in Tempe, AZ.

Taylor Bednarz is a Public Health professional who specializes in controlling the spread of infectious diseases. She is a native of Phoenix, AZ, who attended the North High School International Baccalaureate program and received her Bachelor’s in Global Health from Arizona State University. Taylor went on to complete a Masters of Science in Public Health at Tulane University, with a concentration in Tropical Medicine and Parasitology. She is a deeply dedicated global citizen, and served as a Preventative Health Educator with the United States Peace Corps in Senegal. She returned to Arizona to teach middle school science, and will soon be conducting outbreak surveillance activities throughout Maricopa County. Taylor currently lives in central Phoenix with her sister, two dogs, and three cats, including her fuzzy daughter Sofia Bandita Bednarz.

Laura Taylortaft is a biologist whose work has focused on plant-insect interactions, pollination biology of the endangered San Fernando Valley Spineflower and color signals in butterflies. She did her undergraduate work at Arizona State University and completed a MS in biology at California State University, Fullerton. She returned to ASU to continue her graduate studies and teaching; there she discovered she has a deep passion for sharing her enthusiasm about science. She is happily married, has three human children and one furry one. Laura spends most of her time taking care of her children and engaging them in science and nature exploration. In her free time she enjoys teaching science in her son’s classroom, gardening, crafting and being a baseball mom.

JP Bonadonna is a research technician in the Neisewander Drug Dependence lab at Arizona State University. His current research focuses on treatments for cocaine dependence, particularly testing novel treatment drugs targeting specific dopamine receptors. He graduated from the University of Michigan with a Bachelor of Science in Biopsychology, Cognition and Neuroscience, and plans to pursue a PhD in Clinical Psychology. In his spare time, he loves singing, and is currently part of a co-ed a cappella group at ASU, the TEMPEtations.

Michael Prator is a computer science professional, computer science science educator, and space science advocate who helps run a public observatory in the East Valley. He is a native of Phoenix, AZ and graduate of Arizona State University who spends most of his free-time engaged in astronomy outreach activities for the local community.

We are supported by these dedicated volunteers:

Miranda Cornelius-Fisse, Kristin Clark, Corey Caulkins, Hannah Phipps-Yonas, Dalia Valencia, Melanie Palmer, Carrolette Winstead, Marshall Morgan, Heather White, Charlie Trevino, Ana Khan, Jonathan Camping, Madeleine Unuvar, Claire Nelson, Ashley M. Omelianowich, Connie Lagerhausen, Laura Gerston Dvir, Laura Atwood, Zaria Guignard, Alejandro Martinez, and Paul Ratner.



Our Mission

March for Science is an effort comprising dozens of independent, nonpartisan coordinators, including here in the Phoenix and Tucson areas. Recent rhetoric has inspired us to march on Washington D.C. and in Satellite Marches across the country, including one scheduled here in Phoenix, Arizona, all with the mission to call attention to the importance of science in our everyday lives AND the need for greater science literacy of the public and elected officials. Our mission statement is as follows:

The March for Science champions publicly funded and publicly communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity. We unite as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for science that upholds the common good, and for political leaders and policymakers to enact evidence-based policies in the public interest.


Events

The March for Science is not a discrete event in time - it is a civil awakening and movement with the aim to help educate and advocate science everyday and every way we can. Check back for a list of events building up to the March for Science (April, 22, 2017 - Location information to follow soon) as well as events after the march to keep building on the momentum until we realize the changes we need for science policy at the local, state, and national level.

If you have mobility issues of any kind and will require assistance with light rail or during the march, please email laura.taylortaft@gmail.com to be paired with a Mobility Assistance Volunteer.

Date Event Description
TBD Pre-March Events More info coming soon!
4/22/2017 March for Science Our efforts will coordinate with the main D.C. March and sister marches in cities across the country. Feel free to join our event page or Meetup group, both under Official March for Science - Phoenix. The March for Science - Phoenix and Fair will begin at Cesar Chavez Memorial Plaza (Historic City Hall), 125 W. Washington St., in downtown Phoenix on April 22, 2017 starting with a rally at 10:00. The March proper will start at 11:00 and proceed down Jefferson Street to 5th Street, up to Washington Street and back to 1st Ave, where the Science Fair and speakers will continue until 4:00 PM. Food trucks, water, toilet facilities and FUN will be provided!
TBD Post-March Events More info coming soon!


Diversity

In the past days, scientists have voiced concern over many issues - gag orders for government science agencies, funding freezes, and reversing science based policies. We recognize that these changes will differently and disproportionately affect minority scientists, science advocates, and the global communities impacted by these changes in American policies. Addressing these issues is imperative in understanding how recent developments will affect all people - not simply the most privileged among us. We take seriously your concerns that for this march to be meaningful, we must centralize diversity of the march's organizers at all levels of planning. Diversity must also be reflected in the march itself - both through the mission statement and those who participate.

At the March for Science, we are committed to highlighting, standing in solidarity with, and acting as allies with black, Latinx, Asian and Pacific Islander, indigenous, Muslim, non-Christian, non-religious, women, people with disabilities, poor, gay, lesbian, bisexual, queer, trans, non-binary, agender, and intersex scientists and science advocates. We must work to make science available to everyone and encouraging individuals of all backgrounds to pursue science careers, especially in advanced degrees and positions. A diverse group of scientists produces increasingly diverse research, which broadens, strengthens, and enriches scientific inquiry, and therefore, our understanding of the world.



News

ASU March for Science is a Different Organization

There is confusion about another event and group, the “ASU March For Science,” that was started by a student organization called the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) at ASU. This event was created after logistical disagreements and some disrespectful comments which occurred during meetings between our organizers and representatives of the SDS group. Official March for Science – Phoenix organizers would like to emphasize that we welcome input from students, staff, and faculty at ASU (after all, I work there) despite what the SDS is saying. Furthermore, we would like to officially state that this group is NOT working with us, nor are they working with the nationwide March for Science movement. That being said, we ARE working with the DC march and other satellite marches across the nation to promote consistency in our message and execution. Please advise anyone who is planning to attend the ASU event that it is a protest to ASU's investments in fossil fuels and their ties with Wells Fargo, and that it is NOT a March For Science.

March for Science Announces First Round of Partnerships and New Ways to Support Its Work – Network of Satellite Marches Nears 300 Globally

WASHINGTON (Thursday, February 23) - The March for Science today announced its first round of partner organizations, including many leading scientific, academic, and educational institutions, among them, Earth Day Network (EDN), which will co-organize the national March for Science rally and teach-in in Washington, D.C. on Earth Day, Saturday, April 22. In just the last month since the concept of a March for Science went viral online, 287 satellite marches across the globe have been organized with more coming online every day, and more than 50,000 volunteers have responded to offer assistance. Major partners include the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific organization and a leading publisher of cutting-edge research through its Science family of journals; Sigma Xi, the first scientific organization to partner with the march, and one of the oldest and largest international scientific research honor societies in the world; the Entomological Society of America, the largest organization in the world serving the professional and scientific needs of entomologists and individuals in related disciplines; NextGen Climate America, a non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to advancing policies to prevent climate disaster, promoting prosperity, and protecting fundamental rights for every American; and ScienceDebate.org, which organized a blue-ribbon coalition of 56 leading U.S. non-partisan organizations, representing more than 10 million scientists and engineers, to solicit responses to science-related questions from presidential candidates. For more information read the full press release here.



Volunteer

The March for Science is not a discrete event in time - it is a civil awakening and movement with the aim to help educate and advocate science everyday and every way we can and we need all the help we can get! Please use the form below to sign up to help this crucial cause.

To help us best connect you with the Phoenix March for Science organizers, stay up to date with the latest march information, or offer to volunteer, please use the form below.



Resources

We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology."
- Carl Sagan

Science is everywhere, and there are excellent resources to help learn about science so that you can be a more effective advocate for science in your community. The resources listed below are just of fraction of what is available, but these are a good place to start. Also ... be sure to Like and follow our Facebook page for the latest news and information.

If you have mobility issues of any kind and will require assistance with light rail or during the march, please email laura.taylortaft@gmail.com to be paired with a Mobility Assistance Volunteer.

National March for Science Partners

Other Arizona March for Science groups

Flyers for the March (Print and Share!)

Websites

Rogue Twitter Accounts:

Videos

Donate to Phoenix March for Science Organization Donate to National March for Science Organization

All proceeds will go to funding the March for Science or Phoenix March for Science organizations. Any additional support will be used to promote science outreach and education.